Advocacy

Getting Supports
And Resources
You Deserve

Our Mission

To ensure no one has to navigate their darkest moments alone.

The Role of Self-Advocacy

Having difficulty finding the supports and resources you need?

Self-advocacy is an essential skill that becomes crucial in various aspects of life, whether navigating healthcare, securing accommodations at work, or ensuring your child receives appropriate education. It’s about taking control and ensuring you are treated fairly and respectfully in every situation.

Why does advocacy matter? 

Imagine trying to negotiate a correct diagnosis and proper treatment in a complex medical system, or striving for reasonable adjustments in your workplace that allow you to perform your job effectively despite personal challenges. Perhaps you’ve faced situations in educational settings where you needed to ensure your or your child’s specific needs were met. Self-advocacy empowers you to act on your own behalf in these situations, making informed decisions and standing up for yourself in a confident, informed manner. 

By mastering self-advocacy, you not only enhance your ability to navigate these challenges but also improve your potential for personal and professional growth.

Strengths-Based Self-Advocacy

The Personal Bill of Rights is from the Mary Ellen Copeland Center’s WRAP – Wellness Recovery Action Plan . 

These Personal Bill of Rights can help you decide what you want in life or what you’re working toward in life. They encourage you to express and assert yourself! These Personal Bill of Rights also encourages you to problem solve in your life. I hope you enjoyed reading the Personal Bill of Rights, and that they’ll empower you as they did for me. As a wellness recovery action plan, (“WRAP”) facilitator I wanted to share this important empowerment tool with you. Feel free to share with me your thoughts on these Personal Bill of Rights and how they made an impact in your life! For additional information about wellness recovery please go to www.mentalhealthrecovery.com

Personal Bill of Rights

  • I have the right to ask for what I want
  • I have the right to say no to requests or demands I cannot meet
  • I have the right to change my mind
  • I have the right to make mistakes and don’t have to be perfect
  • I have the right to follow my own values and standards 
  • I have the right to express all of my feelings, both positive and negative, in a manner that will not harm others
  • I have the right to say no to anything when I feel I am not ready, it is unsafe, or it violates my values
  • I have the right to feel angry and to express my anger in a responsible manner
  • I have the right to be uniquely myself I have the right to feel scared and say, “I’m afraid”
  • I have the right to say, “I don’t know”
  • I have the right to make decisions based on my feelings, beliefs and values
  • I have the right to my own reality
  • I have the right to my own need for personal space and time
  • I have the right to be playful and frivolous
  • I have the right to be healthy
  • I have the right to be in a non-abusive environment
  • I have the right to change and grow
  • I have the right to be treated with dignity and respect
  • I have the right to have my needs and wants respected by others
  • I have the right to be happy